Should you stand as a GP?

November 15, 2018

Sitting is the new smoking. Staying sedentary for several hours a day increases your risk of diabetes. So should you stand as a GP?

I remember visiting my GP as a child. Sit in the waiting room normally sullen and low because of yet another episode of tonsillitis. 

Then I was called into the doctor’s office. I would enter a room that CQC would now shut down in a heartbeat with mosaic rugs, plush furry chairs, and a beautiful mahogany desk.

And there was the GP….sitting behind his desk. I remember him moving in his chair to get some forms from a cabinet. I remember him asking me to stand as he examined me sitting in his executive chair, and I remember him always sitting behind a desk. 

Fast forward to a couple of years ago. I remember finishing work with my shoulders feeling tight, my lower back aching for a stretch, as I scooted in my chair to get a form from my cabinet next to my desk. It was at that point I realised I had been sitting in my chair for over four hours. 

I wanted to change this sedentary life. I had a chat with my partners and highlighted I would be changing my room. Shortly after I got a rising desk (Yoyo-90). 

I love it. The build quality is excellent with significant heft. The hydraulic risers are simple to clip and push my whole station upwards to allow me to stand. Initially I could only manage an hour or so before my legs tired out and I had to sit again. A further investment in a standing mat helped there. Within a month I was standing while doing all my admin. Then I took the plunge and stood while consulting with patients.

 

 

Should you stand as a GP?

Some will feel less happy about standing while consulting. I know in sharing my story I have heard several criticisms such as:

  • It means you are trying to rush the patient
  • To stand over a patient is to exert a power dynamic in the consultation
  • It means you are trying to hide the screen from the patient

Over the past year, I have not found any of these to be true. 

  • In my clinic, patients sit while I stand (see the chairs above). 
  • If a patient feels uncomfortable I will sit, however, I have only been asked this twice in the past 18 months.
  • When there is a need for additional empathy, I often sit next to the patient. 
  • I actively share my screens when needed with the patients. 
  • Patients often comment on the desk, about seeing similar in the media and how positive such changes are. 

Sounds encouraging and even our Secretary of State for Health and Social Care – Matt Hancock is very pro-standing desks. 

However, it is important to recognise that standing desks on their own is not enough.  This is a useful article and another here that comments on the opposing view. This includes complications of standing for long periods (tiredness, varicose veins, musculo-skeletal pain from adjusted positions of screens etc.)

Encouraging our patients to be more active is important. So for Self-care week, I am showing how it works in my practice.  Watch the video below and feedback your thoughts on should you stand as a GP?

#TipThursday

 

 

 

 

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When should I worry?

November 8, 2018

Hi #eGPlearners

Welcome to the weekly showcase of Technology-enhanced primary & learning resources from eGPlearning.

When should I worry? This is a common question for parents when looking after an unwell child. In primary care, this can often be a challenge for clinicians to manage due to parental anxiety, the expectation of treatments like antibiotics, concerns about antibiotic resistance and growing demand. 

A helpful resource which can be used with and for patients is the When should I worry booklet found at www.whenshouldiworry.com.

This short booklet provides clear and helpful advice on managing common conditions that can be self-managed by parents, with advice on self-care options, symptom management and importantly clear guidance on when to see further advice. 

The website even offers training on how to use the booklet effectively, and it is available in a variety of languages. Taking it one step further, you may choose to send parents the weblink for the booklet and for the English version: use this helpful case-sensitive shortlink: bit.ly/eGPlearningWSIW

For proactive practices, you could send this as a public information message to all registered parents or share via practice social media channels. 

Watch the video guide below and free to share your thoughts on this resource and as always:

Comments, share and keep eGPlearning. 

#TipThursday

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eGP DRAMA - eGPlearning TipThursday

November 1, 2018

Hi #eGPlearners

Welcome to the weekly showcase of Technology-enhanced primary & learning resources from eGPlearning.

This week TipThursday covers a resource from the eGPlearning platform –  the eGP DRAMA plan

eGP DRAMA (eGPlearning General Practice Disaster Record And Management Action) plan is a fail-safe document used as an adjunct to you practice business continuity plan. 

It identifies and helps record pertinent practice-related information that if not available at key times can lead to significant stress and impact on the business of running a practice. Particularly with larger scale working, such information needs safeguarding and access at appropriate times. 

To store the document ensure either keeping a hard copy in a safe location or preferably store on an encrypted USB stick or password protected part of the practice intranet. 

This document is free for all eGPlearners via signing up below as part of the eGPlearner induction.

However, for the first week of this video, it is accessible directly via this link: www.egplearning.co.uk/gp-productivity

As always, comment, share and keep eGPlearning.

#TipThursday

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